When Employee Retention Fails

When Employee Retention Fails

Wishing Away Change Doesn’t Work – How Managers Can Cope Change – particularly employee turnover – is a constant issue when you’re a manager. The key to dealing with it is acknowledging its existence and being prepared when those changes occur.   Unfortunately, some managers – despite being proactive – still have difficulty handling these changes. A recent Fast Company article discussed how some managers are better able to cope with change. The author suggested that ability – knowing how to compartmentalize, assess, and act – is what separates the good manager or executive from the bad.   But what if you think you aren’t built to do that? Some experts believe the only way a company can change is if they incorporate the way their people change. You may not be able to change, even if your employees do. If you’ve been doing things your way for a long time, and they’ve worked, suddenly veering in a new direction is rough. How can you find that middle ground where you acknowledge the shifts in your staff, but still retain the elements of your management style that made you successful for so long? Maintain Good Relationships with Employees – Going into your respective corners and mumbling under your breath about how “they” don’t get it isn’t productive. Open dialog with your staff will help you maintain a consistent view of office dynamics. When change looks like it may be coming, ideally you’ll have a sense it’s about to happen. You can then react appropriately. Directly Request Commitment – You can’t eliminate the pull of external interests, but you can...
Company Culture Is Key To Employee Retention

Company Culture Is Key To Employee Retention

Welcome to the Culture Club – Why You Can’t Overlook Company Culture “Become the kind of leader that people would follow voluntarily; even if you had no title or position.” – Brian Tracy I recently attended a conference with the intent of learning some new skills I could apply to the marketing and branding aspect of business. Some of the most well-known and respected thought leaders in the industry were on hand to discuss personal experiences, offer advice, and discuss trends. The most surprising takeaway, however, was the overwhelming focus on the importance of company culture. As leaders, we often focus on bottom-line results and motivating our employees to get work done. If we’re on point, we understand the importance of leading by example – the “let’s go” mentality – rather than simply saying “charge” and watching our army from the top of the battlefield, hoping they execute according to plan. But culture is more than that and it plays an important role in retaining your employees. Here are a few ways you can ensure you build a strong company culture. Make Employee Success A Top Priority – Your employees want to know you have a vision for how they’ll succeed within your company, and possibly even beyond. Milestones are important, but what’s even more critical is a plan for growth within the organization. A shared vision for success will have a positive impact on your business. Understand Strengths – Everyone has weaknesses. Trying to figure out how to change an employee – to overcome weaknesses – typically yields little results. Strengths, on the other hand, can be maximized....
You’d Better Make An Employee Retention Plan

You’d Better Make An Employee Retention Plan

Four Tips for Aligning Employee Goals You’ve got to have an Employee Retention Plan. Would you build an addition to your house without a blueprint? Of course not! Would you embark on a cross country trip without a basic understanding of timelines, finances, and landmarks? Unless you’re a drifter, probably not! Business is no different. No matter what line of work you’re in, without a guide for developing and implementing strategies, your organization will go nowhere. A key element of your plan is ensuring your employee goals are aligned with the company mission. Buy in from your staff is essential; otherwise your company will be bouncing in countless directions, which leads to inefficiencies. Large organizations may have the resources to invest in software solutions that force employees to get on the same page. For the average small- or medium-sized business owner, however, similar, albeit less complex outcomes, can be realized by following these four basic tips: Hire Smart or Manage Hard – Sure, this might cause you to take a step back, but the fact is your employees aren’t simply interchangeable parts. Each one has defined strengths and skill-sets. If you have the wrong people, make it a priority to find the right ones or managing becomes hard. When you have the right people, and those employees are matched correctly to the role, you can ensure they’re actively achieving the goals you set out. And those individual goals should align with company goals. Motivate – Employees need to feel committed to organizational goals. As Joel Trammel puts it, you want each person to think like they’re the CEO. But...
For Better Employee Motivation, Stop Stressing!

For Better Employee Motivation, Stop Stressing!

Who’s your Chief Humor Officer? Stressed ManagerChade-Meng Tan, author of Search Inside Yourself: The Unexpected Path to Achieving Success, Happiness (and World Peace), is Google’s official Jolly Good Fellow. Believe it or not, that’s his official job title. As he says on his website, his job is to, “enlighten minds, open hearts, [and] create world peace.” Meng, as he’s more frequently called, guides people through a number of exercises during his lectures, all designed to minimize stress and embrace happiness. His techniques are designed to help people alter their focus. And if a company like Google realizes the impact stress and negative thinking can have on your productivity and happiness, it’s hard to deny there must be something to it. Even the Mayo Clinic believes negativity can have long-term consequences. Everyone has different strategies for combating stress and converting negativity into positive change. Here are a few that may work for you: Focus externally – Yes, you experience stress. We all do. You can choose to obsess about it and let it wear you down, or you can choose to focus on other people. By redirecting your attention, you release personal tension and open the door to helping out others. Be good – ET knew what he was talking about, right? When you’re kind to others, it lifts you up. All those little things that are dragging you down will often float away. As Sophocles said, “Kindness begets kindness evermore.” Recalibrate Perspective – A simple list can be all it takes for you to see all the good floating around. Take time each day to reflect on the good...
Great Boss, Or Bad Boss?

Great Boss, Or Bad Boss?

What’s your management style? Would you say you adhere to a tough love method? Do you believe in the idea proffered by Ilana Yurkiewicz that many bosses think, “harshness creates competence?” Then you might be a jerk. If you are a jerk, you’re probably ruining your employees. And that’s affecting your business. Bossing around your staff doesn’t work. In fact, it makes your employees angry, which in turn makes them not want to work hard and succeed. As a result, you limit the opportunities for the discovery of new, innovative ideas. Those new ideas are what help your company develop. Think about it! Why would someone you treat poorly want to grow in a negative environment? If you’ve historically been a jerk, your employees aren’t going to buy it if you suddenly flip a switch. They’ll likely look at you with suspicion, so you have some work to do. Here are a few simple tips to begin tilting the positive vibes back your way: Stop Focusing on You – Rather than making your employees feel like they should always concentrate on making you happy, try doing something nice for them. Buy lunch now and again. Offer to take your team on a coffee break. You’re not going to immediately escape suspicion, but you can set the stage for consistent positive behaviors down the road. Lead Your Team by Example – You know the stories about incompetent generals who run their soldiers out during war, only to watch them slaughtered from up high, safely away from danger. The kicker? They blame defeat on the dead and wounded, not their poor...