Employee Retention Strategies

Employee Retention Strategies

Eliminating Awkwardness – How to Build Real Relationships with Employees Employee retention often comes down to how well a team member meshes with the rest of your staff. A lot of discussion lately has revolved around the idea of introverts versus extroverts in the workplace. We’ve all had that person in our office who struggles to coalesce. You can’t force him to blend in, but you can create situations where his guard goes down and he relaxes. Maybe having lunch or a few drinks together is all it takes. Until you get to the point where you’re knocking back a few brews during happy hour, you can apply retention strategies in the workplace to eliminate some of the awkwardness and strengthen relationships with those types of employees. Express Your Appreciation – Perhaps the simplest way to get your employee to slough off some discomfort is to frequently espouse your appreciation for them. Positive reinforcement will help your employee relax and, hopefully, open up some. Just remember to appreciate your whole team—don’t make an example of the person you are actually focusing on. Provide Reward – Whether it’s money, public recognition, extra time off, or some other unexpected benefit, when you reward an employee, you’re strengthening your relationship. You get to know her as a person – and vice versa – and that creates motivation. Watch their body language. You’ll see your awkward employees begin to relax. Again, keep it fair, or you risk causing new troubles. Be Real – You were probably an employee once, so you can remember the days when you and your co-workers would talk about...
When Employee Retention Fails

When Employee Retention Fails

Wishing Away Change Doesn’t Work – How Managers Can Cope Change – particularly employee turnover – is a constant issue when you’re a manager. The key to dealing with it is acknowledging its existence and being prepared when those changes occur.   Unfortunately, some managers – despite being proactive – still have difficulty handling these changes. A recent Fast Company article discussed how some managers are better able to cope with change. The author suggested that ability – knowing how to compartmentalize, assess, and act – is what separates the good manager or executive from the bad.   But what if you think you aren’t built to do that? Some experts believe the only way a company can change is if they incorporate the way their people change. You may not be able to change, even if your employees do. If you’ve been doing things your way for a long time, and they’ve worked, suddenly veering in a new direction is rough. How can you find that middle ground where you acknowledge the shifts in your staff, but still retain the elements of your management style that made you successful for so long? Maintain Good Relationships with Employees – Going into your respective corners and mumbling under your breath about how “they” don’t get it isn’t productive. Open dialog with your staff will help you maintain a consistent view of office dynamics. When change looks like it may be coming, ideally you’ll have a sense it’s about to happen. You can then react appropriately. Directly Request Commitment – You can’t eliminate the pull of external interests, but you can...
You’d Better Make An Employee Retention Plan

You’d Better Make An Employee Retention Plan

Four Tips for Aligning Employee Goals You’ve got to have an Employee Retention Plan. Would you build an addition to your house without a blueprint? Of course not! Would you embark on a cross country trip without a basic understanding of timelines, finances, and landmarks? Unless you’re a drifter, probably not! Business is no different. No matter what line of work you’re in, without a guide for developing and implementing strategies, your organization will go nowhere. A key element of your plan is ensuring your employee goals are aligned with the company mission. Buy in from your staff is essential; otherwise your company will be bouncing in countless directions, which leads to inefficiencies. Large organizations may have the resources to invest in software solutions that force employees to get on the same page. For the average small- or medium-sized business owner, however, similar, albeit less complex outcomes, can be realized by following these four basic tips: Hire Smart or Manage Hard – Sure, this might cause you to take a step back, but the fact is your employees aren’t simply interchangeable parts. Each one has defined strengths and skill-sets. If you have the wrong people, make it a priority to find the right ones or managing becomes hard. When you have the right people, and those employees are matched correctly to the role, you can ensure they’re actively achieving the goals you set out. And those individual goals should align with company goals. Motivate – Employees need to feel committed to organizational goals. As Joel Trammel puts it, you want each person to think like they’re the CEO. But...